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Early Childhood Education 2014



Teacher Education Handbook 2012-2013



Education 214 Integrating the Arts in the Elementary Classroom


1. Course Identifier:

Education 214 Integrating the Arts in the Elementary Classroom; Spring, 2013
Capital University

2. Instructors:

Tobie Sanders, 214 Learning Center; tsanders@capital.edu; 614-236-6321
Carolyn Osborne, 222 Learning Center, cosborn2@capital.edu; 614-282-8012 (call or text)

Carolyn's Office Hours: Mondays 11:30-1; Wednesdays noon-1; Fridays 11:30-noon.
Tobie's Office Hours Mondays 10-12; Tuesdays 1-3; Wednesdays 10-12

3. Course Meeting Time:

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1-2:50

4. Course Description:

This integrated experience provides early childhood teacher education students with the current knowledge of and ability to develop and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences, using the central concepts and tools of inquiry in the curriculum content areas of art, music, drama, and movement. This course is offered pass / fail only.

5. Course Goals:


1. Students will explore the arts and their utility in the process of education.
2. Students will engage in tinkering and problem-solving.
3. Students will set their own project goals and work toward them.
4. Students will have opportunities for trying new things.
5. Students will experience emergent curriculum in the context of a student-centered classroom.
6. Students will experience curiosity-based learning.
7. Students will have access to and be encouraged to use technological tools.

Relation of Education 214 to University Mission

The university mission is "Transforming lives through higher education."
One aspect of transformation is stated this way:
"[Capital University] provides for personal growth by encouraging, enabling, and celebrating learning."
Education 214 focuses on creativity and how it can be harnessed for growth and learning in the classroom. The method of this class involves creative learning as a way for students to experience the celebration of learning that takes place when students are fully engaged. The class enables student-initiated learning, based on the idea that when the curriculum emerges from the students, student motivation for learning internalizes and increases.

Relation of Education 214 to Department of Education Goals

Goal 1. Demonstrate thorough knowledge and understanding of the content to be taught

Although the class focuses on the arts and creativity, underpinning that focus is knowledge about the curriculum and content knowledge, which are necessary in order to plan creative projects that are in line with Common Core Standards.

Goal 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the teaching-learning relationship

If the educational process is to be effective in that students actually learn, then teachers need to know how to create the kinds of classroom experiences that inspire engagement and deep-level learning (not just memorization and regurgitation).

Goal 4. Demonstrate effective and culturally responsive practices to support the achievement of all students

When students see themselves reflected in the classroom through books, activities, projects, and so forth, they are likely to become engaged it the learning on which a classroom focuses. Every culture produces art and many art forms lead to self-expression. This class shows students how to do art work (music, visual arts, dance, and drama) from a variety of cultures.

Goal 6. Demonstrate effective use of technology in professional practice

Today's young people do not know a world without informational technology. IT has become as profound a force in the changing of our ways of communicating and disseminating information as the printing press was when it was invented. There are times to use realia, and the class includes a lot of that. There are times when Web 2.0 features as well as Open Source software can lead to artistic expression around a curricular topic, and the class introduces these forms of technology to students and provides opportunities for students to use them.

Goal 9. Understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning

With the overemphasis on standardized testing in the classrooms, college students have often come to think that assessment happens only in the form of tests. This class does not use any form of testing and demonstrates the use of alternative assessment procedures.

6. Intended Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plan:


Goal
Activities
Assessment
1. Students will explore the arts and their utility in the process of education.
Art projects developed by teachers
Art projects students choose
Portfolio will include all art projects on which the student works during the semester
2. Students will engage in tinkering and problem-solving.
Student-initiated art projects often require students to figure out how to make something work given the supplies that we have in the room
Exploring Instructables.com
Student portfolios will contain evidence of tinkering and problem solving
Professors observe and encourage students in their processes of working on projects
3. Students will set their own project goals and work toward them.
After experiencing a number of professor-initiated projects, students will have opportunities to choose what they would like to work on. If students have difficulty in being self-directed, they will be scaffolded so they can develop the skills necessary to being self-directed learners.
Portfolio will contain student projects. Across a classroom of portfolios, there will be a number of unique projects, indicating that students made their own choices.
4. Students will have opportunities for trying new things.
Teacher-initiated art projects are unusual (e.g., creating a stained glass project, playing bluegrass music)
Portfolio will contain all arts activities. Portfolio commentary usually discusses which projects were new to the person doing them.
5. Students will experience emergent curriculum in the context of a student-centered classroom.
Teachers engage students in discussions of what they enjoy doing. When students express an interest, teachers bring in the materials so the interest can be further explored.
Portfolio projects reflect student interests.
6. Students will experience curiosity-based learning.
With emergent curriculum and the flexibility built into this class, students will have the opportunity to express curiosity and to follow through with exploration. The professors encourage curiosity and model it all the time.
Portfolio commentary usually reflects the process of curiosity exploration
7. Students will have opportunities to explore and use technological tools.
An important website we use is Instructables.com. Additionally, both professors are aware of how technology can help students do things that used to be impossible, such as make animations, make edited videos, and so forth.
Portfolios will reflect the use of technology partially because they will be housed on a wiki but also because students frequently choose other technological tools for the creation of their portfolio (e.g., Prezi.com).


7. Required Reading:

The "text" for the course is http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com
This wiki contains information about various projects we have done in the past as well as information on teaching reading and writing. Students use the wiki as an encyclopedia and are also encouraged to add to it as they create projects. The wiki is extensive in scope and always growing.

In the process of exploring other possibilities, students will gain information from a range of websites, including
http://instructables.com
http://ted.com
http://npr.org

A central text for the course is:
Reynolds, Peter H. (2004) Ish. Candlewick Press.

8. Assignments and Examinations:

Somehow, a lot of education has gotten off track as far as understanding that true learning takes place when students are interested in what is being learned. Curiosity is central to the learning process and we would argue that learning does not take place when curiosity is absent. Students might be able to pass tests on topics about which they have no curiosity, but they are not likely to retain that information and less likely to have a positive attitude about it when it comes their turn to teach.

The purpose of this class is to give students the opportunities and time to become curious and to learn things by choice. All students will be doing arts-related activities throughout the whole class. The professors will provide support, scaffolding, and encouragement as students stretch and grow into new things. Students will learn because this is what human beings naturally do. They will learn about themselves, they will learn a lot about teaching, and they will learn new skills, but we cannot predict exactly what they will learn or how they will learn it because we do not know this semester's population.

If we set up a lot of required readings and a trajectory for the course with a set of prescribed activities, we would be robbing our students of a rare opportunity to set their own learning agendas.

We can promise that time is not wasted in this class, and that students will be highly motivated for the kind of learning they will do.

Assessment in this course is ongoing. Formative assessment consists of our observing students and talking with them. We consult with one another about how to help individual students take next steps in what they are doing. Summative assessment consists of a portfolio where students collect their projects and write briefly about them.

Examinations are completely antithetical to the spirit of this course and are not used.

Students create electronic portfolios, recording the projects they work on.

9. Policies:

This is a pass fail course. We assume that students will behave in a manner that is congruent with university policies and rules. Were a student to have problems with this, we would deal individually and privately with that student.

In order to pass the class, students must:

1. Attend class. This is an experiential class and there is no substitute for regular attendance.
2. Engage in classroom activities.

Disability Services

Students with disabilities who need accommodations should contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS) at the beginning of the semester. The ODS offers a range ofaccommodations and support services to ensure equal educational opportunities for eligible students with disabilities. Students may request accommodations by providing documentation of their disability to the Disability Services Coordinator. Faculty, students, and the ODS work as a team to facilitate appropriate services for students with disabilities. The ODS is located in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) in LC 100. Contact Disability Services Coordinator Dr. Cathy McDaniels Wilson, ABPP, Coordinator of Disability Services, by calling 614-236-6114 or by emailing cmcdanielswilson@capital.edu. for additional information.

Academic Success Services


The office of Academic Success (formerly the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching) provides valuable academic support resources for students as they study and work to complete assignments. Regularly scheduled Math Center, Science Center, and Writing Center hours begin the third week of fall semester and the second week of spring semester. Drop-in math, science, and writing tutoring is available during regularly scheduled hours, but it is best to schedule an appointment ahead of time by calling Academic Success at 236-6327, e-mailing AcademicSuccess@capital.edu, or stopping by the Academic Success location on the second floor of Blackmore Library. Independently arranged one-on-one tutorials are also available in a wide range of subjects; consult the Tutor Yellow Pages (available in the Academic Success office and on the Academic Success website at http://www.capital.edu/academic-success/ starting the third week of fall semester and the second week of spring semester) to find a tutor for a particular course. Online eTutoring (www.etutoring.org) is also available in accounting, anatomy/physiology, biology, chemistry, math, statistics, and writing. And finally, students can contact Academic Services Coordinator Bruce Epps at 236-6461 or tutor@capital.edu to schedule an individualized study strategies consultation, or for additional information about Academic Success programs and services.


10. Course Calendar:


January 6 First day of class
Introduction, Ish, stained glass (http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Stained+Glass+and+other+dangerous+things), Dream Flags (http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Dream+Flags)

During the semester, we will do:
Drama project with Dr. Pam Schreurer
Various teacher-initiated art projects, including playing music, doing Pysanky, and so forth
Various student-initiated art projects

Projects will be documented for use in students' portfolios


11. Document History:

This is a significant rewrite of this syllabus. 8/2012
Revised for Spring, 2013, January 3, 2013




Education 314 and 316 Literacy Methods for Junior Block


1. Course Identifier:

Capital University
Education 314 and 316 Literacy Methods in Junior Block
Spring, 2013

2. Instructors:
Tobie Sanders, 214 Learning Center; tsanders@capital.edu; 614-236-6321
Carolyn Osborne, 222 Learning Center, cosborn2@capital.edu; 614-282-8012 (call or text)

Carolyn's Office Hours: Mondays 11:30-1; Wednesdays noon-1; Fridays 11:30-noon.
Tobie's Office Hours: Mondays 10-12; Tuesdays 1-3; Wednesdays 10-12

3. Course Meeting Time:

Either MWF 8-9:50 (for both 314 and 316)
or
MWF 10-11:50
until the beginning of Field Placement and at the end of Field Placement

This course includes a significant field placement in which students are in classrooms all day.

4. Course Description:

Education 314
This course prepares early childhood education candidates to teach writing, listening, visual literacy, and oral communications using appropriate instruction methods, learning activities, and materials based on the Ohio Academic Content Standards for English Language Arts, and national English language arts standards. Candidates learn to assess student learning and to collect and analyze data to evaluate student achievement as well as reflect on their own teaching. The course includes an intensive field experience. Acceptance into Teacher Education Program is required to enroll in this course. Must be taken in conjunction with EDUC 315, EDUC 316, EDUC 317 and EDUC 318. Prerequisite(s): 0 credits; Corequisite(s): EDUC 315 and EDUC 316 and EDUC 317 and EDUC 318

Education 316
This course prepares early childhood education candidates to teach reading using appropriate instructional methods, learning activities, and materials. Education 314 and 316 are closely aligned with each other in recognition of the relationships between language and literacy. This course includes extensive supervised field experience. Course content is aligned with the Ohio English Language Arts Curriculum Content Standards and national English language arts and reading standards. Acceptance into Teacher Education Program is required to enroll. Course must be taken in conjunction with EDUC 314,EDUC 315, EDUC 317 and EDUC 318. Prerequisite(s): 0 credits; Corequisite(s): EDUC 314 and EDUC 315and EDUC 317 and EDUC 318

5. Course Goals:

Relation of Ed 314 to University Mission

Capital University's mission statement is as follows:
By drawing upon the Lutheran principle of free inquiry, Capital University:
  • Provides for personal growth by encouraging, enabling, and celebrating learning;
  • Prepares individuals to be knowledgeable, independent, critical thinkers - educated for lives of leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society;
  • Inspires individuals to be morally reflective, spiritually alive, and civically engaged.
The central experience in the literacy methods (Education 314/316) of the Junior Block experience involves students becoming researching teachers; this is the "What Difference Does Instruction Make" (WDDIM) project. Specifically, they choose a learning experience for children during their field placement. They assess the children prior to the learning experience and they assess them after the learning experience. The paper involves critical thinking because the point of this is to think about why learning worked or didn't work. It involves the celebration of learning because frequently students want to ensure that there is a difference made by instruction or they choose to focus the project on a single, usually struggling, child and want to help the child see him/herself as a capable learner. There is a moral aspect to the research experience as students consider what works and what doesn't work; they are working with real students in their Junior Block field experience and often reflecting on these students' learning through the research project requires moral engagement because teaching requires people to be ethical and to have a moral compass.

Relationship of Ed 314 to Department of Education goals


Goal 2. Engage in critical inquiry to impact professional practice
The "What Difference Does Instruction Make" research project that students complete in this course is designed around helping teachers to carry out research in the classroom and to reflect about what worked and what didn't work in the instructional portion of the project.

Goal 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the teaching-learning relationship
The WDDIM research project requires students to think deeply about various facets of the teaching-learning relationship.

Goal 6. Demonstrate effective use of technology in professional practice
The WDDIM project requires the use of technology in terms of data presentation and data analysis.

Goal 8. Apply ethics and values in professional decision-making
Teachers are morally and ethically required to be successful in helping students to make change in their thinking.

Goal 9. Understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning
The WDDIM project necessarily involves assessments; students then use the assessments to figure out how much of a difference was made in an instructional experience.

6. Intended Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plan:


Competencies

Here are the competencies you will need in the junior block field experience and in student teaching. Also, we have looked at Praxis subject tests to ensure that these topics are covered here. Our hope is that the material here will help you to be a fantastic reading teacher and will get you through the Praxis subject tests safely the first time. There is a very good chance you have covered a lot of this material in other classes; if that is the case, there is no need to repeat that. Just focus on the areas where you feel you need more information and skills.
Subject
Specific Knowledge
Wiki Resource
Assessment
Ohio Standards
Knows the Common Core Standards
Knows how to look up specific grade-level standards
Teaching in Ohio
Portfolio
Reading
Understands literacy development in children and how to support it
Understands reading as a part of general language development (speaking, listening, reading, and writing)
Understands phonemic awareness
Understands the technicalities of the code (phonics)
Understands how to support vocabulary development
Understands how to support fluency in reading
Understands centrality of comprehension and how to support the development of comprehension
Understands that meaning making is a construction process
Understands that children who love to read, read best and knows how to support reading engagement.
Understands the importance of metacognition and knows how to develop it in students
Understands reading-writing connection and using writing as a response to reading
Reading
Literacy Development
Language Development
Phonemic Awareness
Vocabulary
Comprehension
Metacognition
Reading Writing Connection
Portfolio
Writing
Understands the development of writing in children and how to support it.
Understands writing as a part of general language development (speaking, listening, reading, and writing)
Understands invented spelling and how to incorporate it constructively in the classroom
Understands the writing process
Knows how to create writing invitations that engage children
Literacy Development
Language Development
Spelling
Writing Process
Writing and Teaching Writing
Motivation
Portfolio
Spelling
Understands why spelling in English is challenging
Has a general understanding of the role of etymology in English spelling and how that information can be used in the classroom
Has some strategies for teaching spelling
Spelling
Etymology
Portfolio
Grammar
Knows parts of speech
Knows agreement in sentence construction
Can identify an incorrect sentence
Can correct an incorrect sentence
Knows how to use comma, period, question mark, exclamation mark, and quote marks.
Grammar
Punctuation

Both of these pages list tutorials that can help you develop these skills.
Portfolio
Writing Process
Understands that the writing process is not linear
Knows how to support all stages of the writing process
Knows how to encourage writers
Knows how to help writers solve problems
Writing Process
Troubleshooting the Writing Process
Feedback for Students
Portfolio
Differentiating Instruction
Understands why instruction needs to be differentiated.
Knows how to organize texts of multiple reading levels on a single subject
Has and can use Reading Workshop resources
Addressing the Needs of All Students
Kids are not French Fries
Rethinking the Use of Text in the Classroom
Managing Multiple Reading Levels
Examples of multiple texts on one topic
Multiage or Multigrade level Classroom
Reading and Writing Workshop Resources
Portfolio
Assessment
Has a range of possible assessment procedures to use for both reading and writing
Assessment Without Tears
Portfolio
Problem-solving
Knows how to use assessment information and teaching strategies to help children solve literacy-related problems.
Troubleshooting the Reading Process
Troubleshooting the Writing Process
Portfolio
Lesson planning and unit planning
Can create lesson and unit plans that incorporate the interests of students and that are engaging.
Can create written lesson plans that are comprehensive enough that other people can use them in teaching.
Can connect lesson plans to benchmarks.
Can create lesson plans that have a definite relationship to past, present, and future plans for teaching (unit, term, year).
Lesson and Unit Planning
Portfolio
Research
Knows how to collect data and analyze it
Makes data-driven decisions
Research
"What Difference Does Instruction Make?" project
Portfolio will include research project
Technology
Can learn new technologies and apply them to teaching and learning
http://ohioetc.wikispaces.com/
Portfolio

7. Required Reading:

This course includes students from a variety of backgrounds: some traditional Capital University students, some students from Ohio State University who are seeking licensure, and some students from a variety of other backgrounds who are seeking licensure. Because of this wide range of students, we provide a range of materials from which students self-select according to their needs. These readings and related activities are on:
http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com
These readings range from introductory material on various literacy-related topics to research articles one might read in a graduate-level class. This allows all students to make progress, whether they need to review information or extend their knowledge and understanding.

8. Assignments and Examinations:

This is a hybrid class with a significant field placement element. During the weeks we are in class, students will attend class once a week and complete workshops and a reading experience at Nationwide Children's Hospital. Students choose their workshops based on their own professional development needs.

The major written work to be completed in class is a research project called "What Difference Does Instruction Make?" This project includes collecting pre- and post-instruction data and analyzing it in relation to the nature of the instruction in order to decide if the instruction actually worked. Details of the project can be found here:
http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Research#Conducting Research-What Difference Does Instruction Make?

9. Policies:

In our experience the vast majority of students are aware of and compliant with university policies, which is what we expect. When students are not compliant with these policies, we work with those students individually to help them get into compliance.
a. Course-specific Policies
Because Junior Block (of which this course is a part) is a major step towards preparing for student teaching and then graduation, most students approach this class with a desire to become the best teacher they can be. Where students do not have this perspective, we problem solve and work with the student to help them.
b. The office of Disability Services is truly excellent and we are happy to work with them to ensure that all students get the best education possible.
http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Capital+University#Office of Disability Services

c. We encourage students to take advantage of university support for academic excellence:
http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Capital+University#Academic Support Services in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching

10. Course Calendar:

Courses run from August 27 to October 19th. Students are in the field beginning October 22. The first day back in class at Capital is December 3. During the August 27-October 19th, students will be working on the competencies and the experience at Nationwide Children's Hospital. When students return to campus, they will work on the data they have collected during the field placement in order to complete the research project.

11. Document History:

This is a major rewrite to comply with university syllabus requirements 8/2012






Projects for Ed 314/316

One research project "What Difference Does Instruction Make?" to be conducted at your field experience site (copious instructions are available on this wiki: Research)
post your project here:
http://capitalwhatdifferencedoesinstructionmake.wikispaces.com/
One record of your learning in this class, in the form of a scrap book, portfolio, wiki, etc.

How to Do Independent Learning in Ed 314/316

The junior block ECE literacy classes require students to direct their own learning. Here is how to do it.

Purpose

The purpose of having students learn independently is to individualize learning and to meet the specific learning needs of each student. Further, graduate school and the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP or "ippy dippy") both require a lot of self direction, so this process of teaching supports the development of critical skills as a teacher and a learner.

The Learning Cycle

Assess

The first step in this process is to assess oneself. Think about being the only teacher in a classroom. What do you need to know in order to make that classroom a place where students really learn (and not just look like learning as in reading and regurgitation). For the purposes of this class, your self assessment can cover any area of teaching and learning. Also, self assessment can be formal or informal. Some people essentially make a list in their minds as to what they need and they go about getting that. Some people may benefit from a more formal process, perhaps working with another trusted person to figure out what they know or need to learn. Either way is fine.

Plan

After thinking about (and maybe even writing down) what one needs as a learner, it is important to plan how that learning will take place. This wiki and the http://ohioetc.wikispaces.com websites have many different choices for learners, and one could create his/her own curriculum from these resources (and others). Also, how do you know when you have learned something? As you plan, consider what you might do to demonstrate to yourself (primarily) and others (secondarily) that you have a particular skill or can apply information you have learned.

Teach

The cycle suggested here is the exact same one as teachers go through in the classroom. The difference is, you are teaching yourself. This means that you can teach yourself interesting and important things, and your instruction can be tailored to meet your own instructional needs and style.

Assess

After you have had a learning session, assess where you are. Here are some helpful questions to ask yourself:
Was this a really interesting thing to do and you want to explore it further?
Did you understand it?
In three hours, did you get far enough in it that you have what you need from it or would it be a good idea to continue where you left off?
Do you need more clarity/explanation/etc. before you can use what you have worked on?
Did this open up new possibilities that you would like to explore?
Would doing this learning experience again benefit you?

Plan

Would it be a good idea to alter your curriculum for yourself in light of what you just learned?
Would it be a good idea to stick with the plans you made earlier?

Working Independently

When you are in a classroom where you are learning from a professor and reading out of a textbook, you may find yourself skimming to get what you need in order to participate effectively in that class. You may not remember details because you were just going for the high points of the reading. The professor will give you the important details.

When you are working independently, the learning materials (text, power point, video, etc.) are where the teaching actually takes place. Instead of skimming (which is great to do when you look over the workshop or competency to decide if it will help), it is important to read/watch carefully, paying attention to the details. You cannot count on getting another explanation in the college classroom. This is what makes independent learning challenging but also interesting.

Strategies for Success

  • Commit to putting time into your independent learning. Tobie and I suggest the 3 hours a week that you are not spending sitting in our classroom. This kind of learning takes time, so give yourself what you need in order to succeed.
  • Set do-able goals. Goals can always be changed when you realize that you are capable of doing more. But having success in learning is a great foundation for future learning.
  • You are the teacher of a student about whom you have a LOT of knowledge. Look at yourself from a teacher's perspective. What are your strengths? What are things you like when learning? What are things that annoy you? What are things that feel like barriers to learning? What have other teachers done that was successful for you? How do you like to be encouraged? What is discouraging to you? How can you apply this to the planning and teaching of your own learning?
  • Be prepared to ask questions and get clarification, both from the professors and from your fellow students.
  • If one explanation doesn't work, look up the concept on the web and see if you can find an explanation that works better for yourself. Youtube often has short videos that explain concepts clearly.
  • Take responsibility. When others control how you learn, a lot of responsibility is on their shoulders. If you don't get a concept in a textbook, the professor will explain it, probably. In independent learning, you are in charge of the experience so it is a good idea to think about what you don't understand and try a web search or two to find more information as well as talking with professors/other students.

Solving Large Problems

Suppose you look at much of the literacy methods competencies and you wonder how you are going to manage learning all that in a short time period. Suppose you had classes that "taught" you things but for whatever reason you didn't learn them. Suppose you feel overwhelmed not just by the choices you have but also by what feels like a lack of background. Here is where you jump in and try things. If you don't understand what you are interacting with, try to look up key terms online. That way you can build your foundational knowledge at the same time you are building more specialized knowledge. Also, talk with Tobie and Carolyn and we can help you find the best paths for being able to work in this class.


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Education 371 Reading for Learning (Music Education Majors)

The purpose of this class is for you to learn about how students learn literacy and how to support that literacy in the music classroom. Since this wiki is used in two music-related classes (this class and Adolescent and Children's Literature in the Music Classroom), you will find many explicit connections made in the materials between language literacy and music literacy.

Here are the competencies that this class is designed to teach you:

Reading
Knows the complexities of the reading process
Knows how to support literacy development in young children
Knows about the technical aspects of reading: comprehension, readability, vocabulary development
Understands how to teach with multiple texts selected for students' varying reading levels
Is aware of reading resources that support music learning
Understand the connections between linguistic and music literacies
Can articulate how music classrooms support literacy development
Reading (what is reading, really?)
Children of the Code
Literacy Development
Strategies for Teaching Young Children
Readability
Comprehension
Vocabulary Development
Managing Multiple Reading Levels in Your Classroom
Writing
Can create writing assignments that inspire students' creativity
Knows how to respond constructively to student writing in a way that supports and inspires them
Alternatives to the Book Report
Alternatives to the Term Paper
Feedback for Students
Writing and Teaching Writing
Needs of all students
Aware of Universal Design for Learning
Understands how technology can assist people with learning
Can use technology to create learning experiences that meet the need of multiple students
Using Technology to Help People with Disabilities (the Swedish project)
Using Technology to Address the Needs of Students (Smart Board lessons in music)
Universal Design for Learning
Learning Disabled and Reading Music
Assessment
Knows student-centered assessment techniques
Assessment
Activities
Knows music-related activities that support literacy development at all ages
Books That Involve Music
Ballads
Blues
Persuasive Songs
Songs as Cultural Artifacts
Play Party Songs
Opera
Teaching Possibilities has many more ideas you can choose

Here is how the class works:
You show me that you have accomplished each of these areas of competency. The easy way is to look at the links in the right hand column and do some sort of activity related to them. Many of the power points have embedded questions that allow you to demonstrate your understanding and you can then post to Blackboard's discussion group on the activities.

You can also choose your own way of demonstrating competency (I'm open to ideas--the ones that spring to mind are creating lesson plans that incorporate that concept, drawing parallels between learning to read/write music and the ideas that have been presented, actually finding a kid--little sibling/cousin, kid you are teaching and interviewing him or her about a concept related to the competency you are working on).

For the Activities competency, you can choose to do one of these activities (e.g., claymation or making books or any of the many possibilities on Teaching Possibilities as well as the ones that are listed on this page), you can choose to adapt an activity for the kind of music class you will be teaching, you can choose to create your own teaching possibility (and put it on this wiki, or anything else you can think of.

Finally, at the end of the course (when you have finished developing these competencies, which can be before spring break if you like...), please email me a simple list that summarizes what you did for each competency. That way I don't have to go hunting everything down when it comes time to grading.

Everyone has an A going into the course. Reasons for getting less than an A would be ignoring this course for weeks at a time (without contacting me--if you tell me what is going on, your grade will not suffer) and doing a half-hearted job on learning--just doing the minimum possible. This is a competency-based class, so it works like a driver's license test. Everyone has the potential to get an A in this class providing they are reasonably responsible and make an honest effort in the learning part the same way that every person has the potential to get a driver's license (it's not norm-referenced which would assume that 50% of the people being tested for a driver's license would fail the test or get below normal).

A final note. I believe in principles, not a set of rules. What constitutes an honest effort? I think each person knows when he or she is putting in an honest effort and when they are using BS to meet a requirement. My goal for this class is that it have a low PID (pain in the derriere) factor--that there is no busy-work or requirements that make doing the work difficult and boring. Let me know what I can do to improve the class for each one of you specifically and play fair. I think we will all enjoy this process together.

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Education 642 Adolescent and Children's Literature in the Music Classroom


The purposes of this class are to expand students' knowledge of adolescent and children's literature and to provide students with ways literature can enhance the teaching of music. The class is divided into three foci:

Survey: learning about the range and types of adolescent and children's literature as well as semiotics.
Adapt: finding ways of adapting literature into other formats to help children comprehend and to support the teaching of music concepts.
Create: making new cultural artifacts that help in teaching music.

Survey Activities:
Visit to Columbus Library
Ohio ETC Online Workshop, creation/revision of lesson, teaching materials, etc. to reach a wide(r) range of students
"Books That Involve Music" on this wiki
Selection of books/stories to adapt
Share lessons/teaching materials, etc.

Adapt Activities:
Review wiki for adaptation possibilities
Choose 3-5 to try either in small groups or as a whole class
Possible performance of adaptations for rk's (real kids) if group desires

Create Activities:
Choose something to create, from writing a children's book to making a story using some other medium. Can be done individually or in groups, your choice.
Share what you have done, possibly with rk's, if you like.

End products:
Please note that given the small amount of time we have, the focus will be more on process than product; if you do not finish a project, this is fine.
Online workshop response
Wiki Portfolio of your participation in adaptation and creation activities, posted here:
http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Education+642+Portfolio




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Using Web Advisor to Register for Classes


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Capital's mission statement

Transforming lives through higher education.

By drawing upon the Lutheran principle of free inquiry, Capital University:
  • Provides for personal growth by encouraging, enabling, and celebrating learning;
  • Prepares individuals to be knowledgeable, independent, critical thinkers - educated for lives of leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society;
  • Inspires individuals to be morally reflective, spiritually alive, and civically engaged.

Dept. of Ed goals

Goal 1. Demonstrate thorough knowledge and understanding of the content to be taught
Goal 2. Engage in critical inquiry to impact professional practice
Goal 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the teaching-learning relationship
Goal 4. Demonstrate effective and culturally responsive practices to support the achievement of
all students
Goal 5. Utilize a variety of tools to clearly and effectively communicate
Goal 6. Demonstrate effective use of technology in professional practice
Goal 7. Demonstrate professional involvement
Goal 8. Apply ethics and values in professional decision-making
Goal 9. Understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure
student learning




textbox experimentation
=Education 214 Integrating the Arts in the Elementary Classroom= The purpose of this class is for you to learn how to teach the regular classroom curriculum using the arts: music, visual arts, movement/dance, and drama. ==Relation of Education 214 to University Mission== The university mission is "Transforming lives through higher education." One aspect of transformation is stated this way: "[Capital University] provides for personal growth by encouraging, enabling, and celebrating learning." Education 214 focuses on creativity and how it can be harnessed for growth and learning in the classroom. The method of this class involves creative learning as a way for students to experience the celebration of learning that takes place when students are fully engaged. The class enables student-initiated learning, based on the idea that when the curriculum emerges from the students, student motivation for learning internalizes and increases. ==Relation of Education 214 to Department of Education Goals== **Goal 1. Demonstrate thorough knowledge and understanding of the content to be taught** Although the class focuses on the arts and creativity, underpinning that focus is knowledge about the curriculum and content knowledge, which are necessary in order to plan creative projects that are in line with Common Core Standards. **Goal 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the teaching-learning relationship** If the educational process is to be effective in that students actually learn, then teachers need to know how to create the kinds of classroom experiences that inspire engagement and deep-level learning (not just memorization and regurgitation). **Goal 4. Demonstrate effective and culturally responsive practices to support the achievement of all students** When students see themselves reflected in the classroom through books, activities, projects, and so forth, they are likely to become engaged it the learning on which a classroom focuses. Every culture produces art and many art forms lead to self-expression. This class shows students how to do art work (music, visual arts, dance, and drama) from a variety of cultures. **Goal 6. Demonstrate effective use of technology in professional practice** Today's young people do not know a world without informational technology. IT has become as profound a force in the changing of our ways of communicating and disseminating information as the printing press was when it was invented. There are times to use realia, and the class includes a lot of that. There are times when Web 2.0 features as well as Open Source software can lead to artistic expression around a curricular topic, and the class introduces these forms of technology to students and provides opportunities for students to use them. **Goal 9. Understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning** With the overemphasis on standardized testing in the classrooms, college students have often come to think that assessment happens only in the form of tests. This class does not use any form of testing and demonstrates the use of alternative assessment procedures. ==Outcome of Course== Students will collect material related to their activities in the course and put this material into the form of a scrap book or portfolio (either online or on paper or both). The scrap book/portfolio will be evidence of each student's engagement in the course. Course grades will be based on the scrap book/portfolio. ==Course Content== Because each student comes to class with different experiences and understandings, the class will accommodate a lot of self-directed learning to ensure that the class is not repetitive to some and incomprehensible to others. The following table reflects the course curriculum; students will assess themselves in relation to their knowledge about each of these things and will participate in self-directed and class-directed experiences to gain understandings they need. || Emergent Curriculum || Finding out students' interests Funds of knowledge Connecting curriculum to students' interests || [[Emergent Curriculum|Emergent curriculum]] || || Imaginative Education || Knows how to use IE (Imaginative Education) frameworks to create lesson plans || [[Imaginative Education]] || || Music || How to find musical resources How to use these in the classroom regardless of one's own skill level Possibilities for music: acoustics (science and math), ethnomusicology (social studies), songs (literacy but also topic of song can be about other parts of the curriculum), composition of songs (literacy) || [[Using the Arts in Education#chart|Chart of Arts in Relation to Curriculum]] || || Visual Arts || How to find visual arts resources Possible media and ways to alter media How to use these in the classroom regardless of one's own skill level Possibilities for visual arts: spectrum (science), arts of a culture (social studies), arts as representation (all curriculum), patterns (math). || [[Using the Arts in Education#chart|Chart of Arts in Relation to Curriculum]] || || Movement || Time, space, and energy Applying time space and energy to curricular concepts. Creating lessons || [[Using the Arts in Education#chart|Chart of Arts in Relation to Curriculum]] || || Drama || Reader's Theater Classroom drama Puppets || [[Using the Arts in Education#chart|Chart of Arts in Relation to Curriculum]] || || How to write lesson plans || The components of a lesson plan Finding a lesson plan format that is comfortable for you Adapting lessons found on line (increasing the creative aspects of them) || [[Planning Short Term and Long Term for Learning|Planning for Short Term and Long Term Learning]] || In order to demonstrate your newly-found prowess with this material you can... create a wiki create a scrap book (free online) create a video create a story in Alice or Scratch (see [[Narrative]] for details) etc. etc. etc.

1. Course Identifier: The header on the first page will list the course prefix, the course

number, the course section number, the course title, the semester the course is offered, and

Capital University. For example:
Psych 110-01 – Principles of Psychology

Fall Semester 2011

Capital University
2. Instructor: The instructor’s name, office location, telephone number, Capital University

electronic mail address, and office hours will be listed. Full-time faculty members will list a

minimum of five office hours per week. For example:
Instructor: John P. Smith, Ph.D., Renner Hall Room 401, Telephone 614-236-5555, Email

address jsmith32@capital.edu, Office Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00 p.m. – 2:50

p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.
3. Course Meeting Time: The class meeting time will be clearly stated and will minimally

require one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction each week per credit hour for

fifteen weeks or the equivalent amount of time over a different period. Faculty members

are expected to meet for the amount of time designated in the syllabus and utilize all

scheduled course sessions, including the final examination period. The syllabus also will

contain a statement about the work required outside of class: “Students enrolled in this

course are expected to engage in a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work per

credit hour per week related to the course.”
If the course does not follow a standard class meeting time (e.g., distance education,

alternative delivery, hybrid delivery, laboratory work, internships, practica, or other

non-standard work), then the syllabus will provide a sufficiently detailed explanation of

practices employed to establish equivalence to the minimum required class meeting time

and out-of-class work.
4. Course Description: The official course description that appears in the Bulletin will be

reprinted, including the course credit hours and course prerequisites.
5. Course Goals: The course’s relationship to the university’s mission, general education

goals, and unit goals will be stated as applicable.
6. Intended Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plan: The intended learning outcomes

will be clearly stated, aligned with the course level and credit hours awarded and verifiable

by the stated assessment plan.
7. Required Reading: The required reading will be listed and referenced according to a

commonly accepted style for the discipline.
8. Assignments and Examinations: The syllabus will describe information about the

assignments and examinations and related course activities, including where applicable

information about grading rubrics, grade assignment, assessment procedures, in-class and

out-of-class work, etc. (Please offer sufficient detail for the reviewer of a course to estimate
the amount of out-of-class work required and the level of difficulty.)
9. Policies: The syllabus will refer students to more detailed statements of University

academic policies, by providing web links or references to the relevant University

documents. For example, a syllabus may state: “Students enrolled in this course are subject

to all governing University and academic unit policies. These policies contain important

information about academic integrity, plagiarism, attendance, drop dates, incomplete

grades, grade disputes, refunds, and human dignity. It is the student’s responsibility to

review these policies that may be found in the following sources: Undergraduate Bulletin

or associated graduate bulletin or unit student handbook, Code of Student Conduct and

Academic Integrity, and Student Handbook. See...” In addition to the above general

statement, the syllabus will address the following policies:
a. Course-specific Policies

b. A statement regarding the availability of Disability Services, e.g., “Students in this

course shall have access to disability services pursuant to the university disability

policy found at…”

c. A statement regarding the availability of Academic Success Services, e.g., “Students

in this course shall have access to academic success services pursuant to the

university policy found at…”
10. Course Calendar: A tentative course calendar will be printed in the syllabus that includes a

chronology of course topics, assignment due dates, and an examination schedule.
11. Document History: The last page of the syllabus will include a document history that

maintains when the syllabus was reviewed and approved. For example:
Document History:

Reviewed and Approved by Department on 09/01/2011

Reviewed and Approved by the College Curriculum Committee on 09/20/2011
Document History:

Reviewed by Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee (November 16, 2011)
Credit Hour Policy and Syllabus Format (2011-11-16)




1. Course Identifier
Education 314 and 316
Fall Semester 2012
Capital University

2. Instructors
Tobie Sanders: tsanders@capital.edu
Carolyn Osborne: cosborn2@capital.edu; 614-282-8012 (text or call); Learning Center 222, Mon. 12-1, 3-4, Wed. 12-1, Friday 12-1, 3-4

3. Course Meeting Time
Tuesday mornings, 8-11 plus individualized online assignments

4. Course Description: The official course description that appears in the Bulletin will be



reprinted, including the course credit hours and course prerequisites.

5. Course Goals:


Capital University's mission statement is as follows:

By drawing upon the Lutheran principle of free inquiry, Capital University:

  • Provides for personal growth by encouraging, enabling, and celebrating learning;
  • Prepares individuals to be knowledgeable, independent, critical thinkers - educated for lives of leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society;
  • Inspires individuals to be morally reflective, spiritually alive, and civically engaged.

The central experience in the literacy methods (Education 314/316) of the Junior Block experience involves students becoming researching teachers; this is the "What Difference Does Instruction Make" (WDDIM) project. Specifically, they choose a learning experience for children during their field placement. They assess the children prior to the learning experience and they assess them after the learning experience. The paper involves critical thinking because the point of this is to think about why learning worked or didn't work. It involves the celebration of learning because frequently students want to ensure that there is a difference made by instruction or they choose to focus the project on a single, usually struggling, child and want to help the child see him/herself as a capable learner. There is a moral aspect to the research experience as students consider what works and what doesn't work; they are working with real students in their Junior Block field experience and often reflecting on these students' learning through the research project requires moral engagement because teaching requires people to be ethical and to have a moral compass.


Goal 2. Engage in critical inquiry to impact professional practice

The "What Difference Does Instruction Make" research project that students complete in this course is designed around helping teachers to carry out research in the classroom and to reflect about what worked and what didn't work in the instructional portion of the project.



Goal 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the teaching-learning relationship

The WDDIM research project requires students to think deeply about various facets of the teaching-learning relationship.



Goal 6. Demonstrate effective use of technology in professional practice

The WDDIM project requires the use of technology in terms of data presentation and data analysis.



Goal 8. Apply ethics and values in professional decision-making

Teachers are morally and ethically required to be successful in helping students to make change in their thinking.



Goal 9. Understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning

The WDDIM project necessarily involves assessments; students then use the assessments to figure out how much of a difference was made in an instructional experience.



6. Intended Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plan: The intended learning outcomes



will be clearly stated, aligned with the course level and credit hours awarded and verifiable



by the stated assessment plan.

7. Required Reading: The required reading will be listed and referenced according to a



commonly accepted style for the discipline.

8. Assignments and Examinations: The syllabus will describe information about the



assignments and examinations and related course activities, including where applicable



information about grading rubrics, grade assignment, assessment procedures, in-class and



out-of-class work, etc. (Please offer sufficient detail for the reviewer of a course to estimate

the amount of out-of-class work required and the level of difficulty.)

9. Policies: The syllabus will refer students to more detailed statements of University



academic policies, by providing web links or references to the relevant University



documents. For example, a syllabus may state: “Students enrolled in this course are subject



to all governing University and academic unit policies. These policies contain important



information about academic integrity, plagiarism, attendance, drop dates, incomplete



grades, grade disputes, refunds, and human dignity. It is the student’s responsibility to



review these policies that may be found in the following sources: Undergraduate Bulletin



or associated graduate bulletin or unit student handbook, Code of Student Conduct and



Academic Integrity, and Student Handbook. See...” In addition to the above general



statement, the syllabus will address the following policies:

a. Course-specific Policies



b. A statement regarding the availability of Disability Services, e.g., “Students in this



course shall have access to disability services pursuant to the university disability



policy found at…”



c. A statement regarding the availability of Academic Success Services, e.g., “Students



in this course shall have access to academic success services pursuant to the



university policy found at…”

10. Course Calendar: A tentative course calendar will be printed in the syllabus that includes a



chronology of course topics, assignment due dates, and an examination schedule.

11. Document History: The last page of the syllabus will include a document history that



maintains when the syllabus was reviewed and approved. For example:

Document History:



Reviewed and Approved by Department on 09/01/2011



Reviewed and Approved by the College Curriculum Committee on 09/20/2011

Document History:



Reviewed by Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee (November 16, 2011)

Credit Hour Policy and Syllabus Format (2011-11-16)