Course Identifier

Education 371-01Reading for LearningSpring Semester 2014Capital University

Instructor Information

Carolyn Osborne
222 Learning Center (office)
LC05 (classroom I am in on MWF--you are welcome to drop by)

Office hours: Monday and Friday 12-1, 3-4
Wednesday 12-1

Email: cosborn2@capital.edu
Cell Phone: 614-282-8012 text or talk

Course Meeting Time

This course is conducted online. Course activities will require 6 hours of engagement per week.

Course Description

This course develops understanding and acceptance of the importance of reading as a means to learning, to accessing information, and to enhancing the quality of life. Students will come to recognize the importance of embedding reading instruction in a meaningful context for the purpose of accomplishing specific, authentic tasks. In addition, they will acquire strategies that are necessary for teaching content area reading. This course is for Music Education majors only. Prerequisite(s): 0 credits;

Course Goals

Students will become aware of the complexities of the reading process and language and literacy development.
Students will learn to relate the process of learning to read music to the process of learning to read language.
Students will learn how to assess literacy-related activities.
Students will learn about technological tools helpful in teaching literacy-related lessons
Students will gain experience with projects that combine music and linguistic literacy.

Intended Learning Outcomes and Assessments

Goal
Learning Activities (Units)
Assessment
Students will become aware of the complexities of the reading process and language and literacy development and how to support students in literacy development.


Reading, Children of the Code, Comprehension


Awareness of writing
Alternatives to book report/term paper
Reading
Children of the Code
Language Development
Literacy Development
Vocabulary
Comprehension
Readability
Phonemic Awareness
Strategies for Teaching Young Children
Writing and Teaching Writing
Alternatives to Standard Writing Genres
Spelling
Etymology
Metacognition
Environmental Print
Motivation
Children’s Writing
Unit Posts
Students will learn to relate the process of learning to read music to the process of learning to read language.

Semiotics, Language development
Reading
Semiotics and Semiotic Systems
Final
Unit Posts, Final
Students will learn how to assess literacy-related activities.
Troubleshooting, Choice words, Feedback
Troubleshooting Reading
Troubleshooting Writing
Feedback for Students
Choice Words
Unit Posts
Students will learn about technological tools helpful in teaching literacy-related lessons
Multiple reading levels
Dictionaries
Music Teaching Standards Project
Unit Posts
Students will gain experience with projects that combine music and linguistic literacy.

Creative project
Choral Reading
National Anthems Project
Classroom Drama
Composer Scavenger Hunt
Creative Project
Unit Posts, Creative Project
Each unit requires students to post comments to the Forums on iLearn. These comments are responses to questions embedded in the unit that require students to apply what they are learning. High quality posts indicate that the student both understands the material and can apply it.
The creative project involves choosing one of several possibilities.
The final is a defense of music education that shows how teaching music is supporting literacy development.

Required Reading

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Reading
Which includes:
Norman Unrau. Content Area Reading and Writing: Fostering Literacies in Middle and High School Culture. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall, 2004 Chapter 1
Cambourne (1995) Toward an educationally relevant theory of literacy learning: Twenty years of inquiry. The Reading Teacher Vol. 49, No. 3


http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Semiotics+and+Semiotic+Systems
Extensive information on semiotics

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Children+of+the+Code
Videos

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Etymology
Video

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Language+Development
Summary of Shirley Brice Heath's work

Access to
http://www.indiana.edu/~hlw/index.html, a book on the neuroscience of language

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Choice+Words
Dombro, Jablon, and Stetson (2010) Powerful Interactions Begin With You. TEACHING YOUNG CHILDREN VOL 4 NO 1

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Literacy+Development
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Choral+Reading
Written information


http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Vocabulary
Lehr, Osborn, and Hiebert (2004). A Focus on Vocabulary. Pacific Resources for Education and Learning.

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Dictionaries
Links to many different kinds of dictionaries.

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Comprehension
Extensive written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Metacognition
Boulware-Gooden, Carreker, Thornhill, and Joshi. Instruction of Metacognitive Strategies Enhances Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Achievement of Third-Grade Students. http://www.readingrockets.org/article/21160/, accessed 12/29/12


http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Readability
Extensive writing, including excerpts from Kofi Agawu's Playing with Signs (semiotics of music) and Derrida's Structure, Sign, and Play.

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/National+Anthem+Project
Lesson plan

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Phonemic+Awareness
Scharer. Phoneme Phun: Learning by Playing with Letters, Sounds, and Words. Early Childhood Building Blocks. OhioORC.org.

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Classroom+Drama
Written information


http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Assessment+Without+Tears#Troubleshooting the Reading Process
ARMUS, MONTGOMERY, and JELLISON. (2006) DISCRIMINATION LEARNING IN PARAMECIA (P. caudatum). The Psychological Record, 56, 489-498

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Assessment+Without+Tears#Troubleshooting the Writing Process
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Addressing+the+Needs+of+All+Students#Managing Multiple Reading Levels
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Music+Teaching+Standards+Project
Technology resource

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Strategies+for+Teaching+Young+Children
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Environmental+Print
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Writing+and+Teaching+Writing
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Motivation
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Alternatives+to+Standard+Writing+Genres
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Composer+Scavenger+Hunt
Written information

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Feedback+for+Students

Cutler, C. (2002). Helping Writers Create Explicit Texts: From Crisis Calls to Classrooms. Language Arts Journal of Michigan.


http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Children%27s+Writing
Samples of children's writing

http://literacymethods.wikispaces.com/Spelling
Written information


Assignments and Examinations

Unit Posts

For each unit, students will write a post that answers questions embedded in the unit. These questions are designed to help students apply what they are learning.

Rubric:

A
B
C
D
E
Post reflects material learned and a reasonable and creative application of it.
Post reflects material learned, application is mildly problematic (unrealistic or not well-thought-out)
Either
the
material
learned or the application is missing.
Post does not make sense
No post

Creative Project

Students can choose from the following possibilities and create something based on the instructions on the wiki page:
Blues
Ballads
Baseball Cards
Carnival Poetry
Claymation
Comic Strips and Books
Dream Flags
Envelope Puppets
Persuasive Songs
Poetry
Presidential Poetry
Reader’s Theater
Songs as Cultural Artifacts

or

Students can create their own creative project based on something that interests them and would be useful in a music classroom.

Rubric:

A
B
C
D
E
Project reflects thought and originality.
Project reflects a small amount of thought.
Project looks like it was thrown together at the last minute
Project does not make sense.
No project.


Final

Students will use what they have learned in the class to create a presentation or a letter that could be read by stakeholders (local board of education, citizens, etc.) that argues for keeping music in the curriculum.

Rubric:

A
B
C
D
E
Final addresses specific audience, includes material from the class, and is persuasive.
Final addresses general audience, includes material from class.
Final includes material from class.
Final unrelated to class.
No final

Policies

Students enrolled in this course are subject to all governing University and academic unit policies. These policies contain important information about academic integrity, plagiarism, attendance, drop dates, incomplete grades, grade disputes, refunds, and human dignity. It is the student’s responsibility to review these policies that may be found in the following sources: Undergraduate Bulletin or associated graduate bulletin or unit student handbook, Code of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity, and Student Handbook.

Academic Success

The office of Academic Success (formerly the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching) provides valuable academic support resources for students as they study and work to complete assignments. Regularly scheduled Math Center, Science Center, and Writing Center hours begin the third week of fall semester and the second week of spring semester. Drop-in math, science, and writing tutoring is available during regularly scheduled hours, but it is best to schedule an appointment ahead of time by calling Academic Success at 236-6327, e-mailing AcademicSuccess@capital.edu, or stopping by the Academic Success location on the second floor of Blackmore Library. Independently arranged one-on-one tutorials are also available in a wide range of subjects; consult the Tutor Yellow Pages (available in the Academic Success office and on the Academic Success website at http://www.capital.edu/academic-success/ starting the third week of fall semester and the second week of spring semester) to find a tutor for a particular course. Online eTutoring (www.etutoring.org) is also available in accounting, anatomy/physiology, biology, chemistry, math, statistics, and writing. And finally, students can contact Academic Services Coordinator Bruce Epps at 236-6461 or tutor@capital.edu to schedule an individualized study strategies consultation, or for additional information about Academic Success programs and services.

Disability Services

Students with disabilities who need accommodations should contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS) at the beginning of the semester. The ODS offers a range of accommodations and support services to ensure equal educational opportunities for eligible students with disabilities. Students may request accommodations by providing documentation of their disability to the Disability Services Coordinator. Faculty, students, and the ODS work as a team to facilitate appropriate services for students with disabilities. The ODS is located in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) in LC 100. Contact Disability Services Coordinator Dr. Cathy McDaniels Wilson, ABPP, Coordinator of Disability Services, by calling 614-236-6114 or by emailing cmcdanielswilson@capital.edu. for additional information.


Course Calendar

Units are due at the end of the week in which they are assigned.
Week
Assignment
1
Reading
Semiotics and Semiotic Systems
2
Children of the Code
Etymology
3
Language Development
Choice Words
4
Literacy Development
Choral Reading
5
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
6
Comprehension
Metacognition
7
Readability
National Anthems Project
8
Phonemic Awareness
Classroom Drama
9
Troubleshooting Reading
Troubleshooting Writing
10
Multiple reading levels
Music Teaching Standards Project
11
Strategies for Teaching Young Children
Environmental Print
12
Writing and Teaching Writing
Motivation
13
Alternatives to Standard Writing Genres
Composer Scavenger Hunt
14
Feedback for Students
Children’s Writing
15
Spelling
Using the Arts in Education
16
Creative Project

Final

Document History

Revised 12/12 for Spring, 2013
Revised 12/13 for Spring, 2014